Volts to Joules calculator

The “Volts to Joules Calculator” is a user-friendly online tool designed to effortlessly convert electrical potential difference (volts) into energy (joules). By entering the voltage and the corresponding charge in coulombs, the calculator efficiently applies the formula: Energy (in joules) = Voltage (in volts) × Charge (in coulombs).

Volts to Joules Calculator

Volts to Joules Calculator Tool

You May Also Like:

How To Convert Volts into Joules?

Converting volts into joules requires using the formula that relates these two units of measurement. The formula to convert volts (V) to joules (J) is:

Energy (in joules) = Voltage (in volts) × Charge (in coulombs)

Where:

  • Voltage (V) is the electric potential difference or voltage applied across a circuit or device.
  • Charge (in coulombs) is the amount of electric charge that flows through the circuit or device.

Here are a few examples to illustrate how to convert volts into joules:

Example 1: Let’s say we have a circuit with a voltage of 12 volts and a charge of 5 coulombs. To calculate the energy (in joules) produced or consumed by this circuit, we use the formula:

Energy (Joules) = 12 volts × 5 coulombs Energy (Joules) = 60 Joules

So, in this example, the energy produced or consumed by the circuit is 60 joules.

Example 2: Suppose we have a battery supplying power to a device with a voltage of 9 volts and a charge of 2 coulombs. To find the energy delivered by the battery to the device, we use the formula:

Energy (Joules) = 9 volts × 2 coulombs Energy (Joules) = 18 Joules

In this case, the energy delivered by the battery to the device is 18 joules.

Example 3: Consider a capacitor in an electronic circuit with a voltage of 5 volts and a charge of 0.5 coulombs. To calculate the energy stored in the capacitor, we use the formula:

Energy (Joules) = 5 volts × 0.5 coulombs Energy (Joules) = 2.5 Joules

In this example, the energy stored in the capacitor is 2.5 joules.

Remember, when performing these calculations, make sure you are using the correct units for voltage (volts) and charge (coulombs) to get the result in joules. Also, keep in mind that this formula assumes that the voltage remains constant during the process, as joules represent the energy transferred when a constant voltage is applied over a certain amount of charge.